K - 12 Plus News

Philippine, German business groups forge skills matching program


By Richmond S. Mercurio (The Philippine Star) | Updated September 22, 2015 - 12:00am

MANILA, Philippines - The Philippine Chamber of Commerce and Industry (PCCI) is teaming up with the German-Philippine Chamber of Commerce and Industry (GPCCI) in helping boost youth employment in the country.

Under the agreement signed by the two business chambers, the GPCCI will contribute its experience regarding the German dual training education while PCCI will support the activities by providing information and support through its member-companies.

The collaboration between PCCI and GPCCI is targeted to result in a supply of well-skilled workers contributing to innovation and competitiveness of companies as well as help young Filipinos learn skills that would fit them for jobs and thereby increase youth employment and the income of their families.

PCCI president Alfredo Yao said the agreement provides the formal structure under which both chambers could adopt and implement to make available apprenticeships, entrepreneurship and employment services that can help young Filipinos make the transition from school and training to decent work.

Yao said businesses need to invest in creating and maintaining a high-performance workforce if they are to are to keep their competitive advantage in the Asean and global marketplace.

He said Increasing shortages in productive manpower are already being felt by several companies finding difficulty in recruiting skilled workers.


“PCCI member-companies and the industries they represent are in agreement towards the importance of narrowing the gap between skills in demand by industry and the skills that are being taught and are currently available,” he said.

“There are jobs, but few workers could fit them. If young Filipinos are skilled, they could get hired and raise total family earnings,” Yao added.

PCCI, German chamber agree to help young match skills needed by employers

 

Ambassador Alfredo M. Yao (second from right), president of the Philippine Chamber of Commerce and Industry (PCCI), and Dr. Bodo Goehrlich, president of the German Chamber of Commerce and Industry (GPCCI), exchange copies of a memorandum of agreement formalizing an alliance to implement initiatives to help young Filipinos gain skills that match the needs of employers. Signing as witnesses were Peter Kompalla (extreme left), GPCCI executive director, and Dr. Alberto P. Fenix (extreme right), president of the PCCI Human Resources Development Foundation. At the background are PCCI officials George T. Barcelon, Sergio R. Ortiz-Luis, Jr., and Donald G. Dee.

 

 

PCCI, German chamber agree to help the young match skills needed by employers

 

The Philippine Chamber of Commerce and Industry (PCCI), the country’s largest business organization, and the German-Philippine Chamber of Commerce and Industry (GPCCI) have formed an alliance to help young Filipinos learn skills that would fit them for jobs, and, thereby, increase youth employment and the income of their families.

The two chambers signed a memorandum of agreement on September 15, 2015, which provided for a collaboration to support a dual vocational training system – the K to 12 Plus Project -- that, as in Germany, would result in a supply of well-skilled workers contributing to innovation and competitiveness of companies.

Under the MOA, the GPCCI would contribute its experience regarding the German dual training education, and PCCI would support the activities by providing information and support through its member-companies.

The memorandum was signed at the PCCI board room by Ambassador Alfredo M. Yao, PCCI president, and Dr. Bodo Goehrlich, GPCCI president. Signing as witnesses were Dr. Alberto P. Fenix, Jr., chairman of the PCCI-Technical – Vocational Education and Training Committee and president of the PCCI Human Resources Development Foundation, and Peter Kompalla, GPCCI executive-director.

PCCI president Yao said the MOA provides the formal structure under which both chambers can adopt and implement initiatives to make available apprenticeships, entrepreneurship and employment services that can help young Filipinos make the transition from school and training to decent work.

The two chambers, he said, are expressing their strong support for the aims of the K-12 Education Reform Law by providing further education and training for industrial skills through the K- to 12 Plus program.

Under the K to 12 Plus program, the youth would undergo simulated real-workplace experiences as conducted in companies and vocational schools in Germany, he said.

Yao said that businesses need to invest in creating and maintaining a high-performance workforce if they are to are to keep their competitive advantage in the Asean and global marketplace.

Increasing shortages in productive manpower are already being felt by several companies finding difficulty in recruiting skilled workers, Yao said.

“PCCI member-companies and the industries they represent are in agreement towards the importance of narrowing the gap between skills in demand by industry and the skills that are being taught and are currently available,” he said.

“There are jobs, but few workers could fit them,” he said. “If young Filipinos are skilled, they could get hired and raise total family earnings.”

The K to 12 PLUS Project is a multi-stakeholder initiative supported by the German Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ). This project aims to assist the ongoing Education and Training Reform of the Government of the Philippines. The overall objective is to contribute to increased employment and income of Filipino youth and their families, and to matching the needs of companies for mid- to high level qualified employees.

Other PCCI officials at the signing were Donald G. Dee, Sergio Ortiz-Luis, Jr., Anton Sayo of the PCCI, Eduardo Lacson, Benedicto V. Yujuico, George T. Barcelon, Ramon Escueta, Apolinar E. Aure, Eduardo Nicolas, Cris Frianeza, and Danilo Madlansacay

Also at the event were GPCCI officials including Tristan Loveres of TUV Rheinland Philippines, Kristina Silan and Johannes Richter, and K-to-12 Plus Project officials Tobias Bolle and Isagani Cruz.

 

 

PCCI taps German gov’t funding, expertise for K to 12 ‘dual training’ system

Sept. 15, 2015

The Philippine Chamber of Commerce and Industry (PCCI) yesterday signed a memorandum of agreement (MoA) with the German-Philippine Chamber of Commerce and Industry (GPCCI) for the K to 12 project, said Alberto P. Fenix, Jr., president of the PCCI Human Resources Development Foundation.
The program will be carried out through a “dual training mode,” where the school education of youth aged 16 to 18 will be complemented by on-the-job training with partner companies.
“They will be selected in identified priority sectors where we need workers like hospitality or tourism, construction, agriculture, IT (information technology) and BPO (business process outsourcing),” Mr. Fenix said in a telephone interview yesterday.
In his speech during the MoA signing at the PCCI headquarters in Taguig City, PCCI President Alfredo M. Yao said the Philippines faces a “crisis in youth employment.”
“Technical vocational education and training is a key to train our youth and prepare them to be productive for the world of work,” he said.
“In order to keep up with technological change in global value chains, businesses need to invest across the entire system that build work force skills.”
GPCCI will contribute its experience with the dual education system in Germany, assisted by PCCI’s member companies.
“The first phase will be finished in 2016, but we hope and expect that there will be more funding from the German government,” Mr. Fenix said. -- Daphne J. Magturo

http://www.bworldonline.com/content.php?section=Economy&title=pcci-taps-german-gov&8217t-funding-expertise-for-k-to-12-&145dual-training&8217-system&id=115367

Business Group Ink Agreemeent to Promote PH, Germany Trade

Amy R. Remo Philippine Daily Inquirer Sept 16, 2015

The Philippine Chamber of Commerce and Industry on Tuesday formalized its partnership with the German-Philippine Chamber of Commerce and Industry, as part of efforts to boost bilateral trade, investments and cooperation between the two business groups.
A memorandum of agreement was signed on Tuesday, signifying the commitment by both business groups to undertake various initiatives and programs geared toward achieving their shared goal.
Under the MOA, both PCCI and GPCCI committed to “take all the opportunities within their competence to promote, strengthen and expand trade, economic, scientific, technological cooperation and other business relations between concerned organizations and firms of both parties.”


Both groups are also expected to exchange information about commerce, industry and economy in general, as well as assist their respective members in “establishing and strengthening business contacts through the organization of events such as conferences, seminars, study tours, exchange of trade groups and participation in trade fairs, with the objective of promoting the growth of trade between Filipino and German businessmen.”
The two parties are also expected to closely cooperate in the field of Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET).
GPCCI will contribute its experience on dual education in Germany while the PCCI will support the activity by providing information and support though its member-companies.
PCCI president Alfredo M. Yao pointed out that one of the more crucial components of the agreement was the collaboration on training and education.
“The PCCI believes that growth and development strategies should be strongly based on human resources development. In order to keep up with technological change in global value chains, businesses need to invest across the entire system that builds workforce skills,” Yao explained in his speech on Tuesday.
“The Philippines is confronted with a crisis in youth employment and Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) is a key to train our youth and prepare them to be productive for the world of work,” he added.


Read more: http://business.inquirer.net/199244/business-groups-ink-agreement-to-promote-ph-germany-trade#ixzz3m9IXs8Dz
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Immersion as Mode of Delivery

MINI CRITIQUE By Isagani Cruz (The Philippine Star)

We must never forget the three reasons we added three years (Kindergarten and Grades 11 and 12) to the basic education cycle of students in public schools. (Private school students have always had more than ten years of pre-university education.)
First, we wanted to make our college graduates internationally competitive. That means that even public high school graduates had to enter college with at least 12 years of pre-university education, like everybody else in the world. Even before DepEd added the three years to basic education, CHED had already decided to change the college curriculum to make it comparable to those of ASEAN countries and the rest of the world. Before K to 12, high school graduates were not ready to tackle the enhanced college curriculum. (Engineering majors, for example, had to waste their college time studying calculus.)
Second, we wanted to help those who finished high school but did not go to college. Enterprises did not want to employ them because they were too young to seek employment, and more important, they did not have the skills to be employed. To get those skills, they had to pay their way through TESDA training.
Third, we wanted to increase the number of entrepreneurs in the country, because small and medium enterprises (SMEs), as various international conferences have pointed out, “play a key role in transition and developing countries. These firms typically account for more than 90% of all firms outside the agricultural sector, constitute a major source of employment and generate significant domestic and export earnings. As such, SME development emerges as a key instrument in poverty reduction efforts.” High school graduates who could not continue to college or were not hired by enterprises should be able to put up their own businesses.
The Academic track of Senior High School takes care of the first objective. Using a combination of core subjects that everyone in college needs (roughly equivalent to the current General Education Curriculum) and specialized subjects that particular majors demand (such as calculus for engineering students), this track ensures that K to 12 graduates can study anywhere in the country or even abroad without being disadvantaged.
Immersion as a subject in the Academic track is meant to prepare the student for college. That is why it is only one of four options for the “Work Immersion / Research / Career Advocacy / Culminating Activity” subject. Depending on what the student wants to major in in college, immersion could be more useful than research or some other activity. That is why immersion is given only 80 hours at most in the Academic track.

To answer the second objective of the K to 12 reform, students who are not thinking of going to college immediately after high school need to have employable skills. In practice, the institutional way of proving that one has skills is to have National Certificates (NCs). These are given by TESDA. DepEd and TESDA got together to formulate the curriculum for the Technical-Vocational-Livelihood track.
This is where the word “immersion” has a different meaning from its meaning in the Academic track.
Section 6 of RA 10533 (the K to 12 law) made it compulsory for DepEd, CHED, and TESDA to consult business chambers in the formulation of the curriculum. The reason is that it is the employers that know what skills they want. The mismatch that characterized education and industry in the past was due to a simple lack of communication: educators hardly ever asked employers what students should be learning. The law makes sure that this does not happen again.
To put flesh into that provision of the law, the government signed a “Joint Declaration of Intent” with the Federal Republic of Germany, since Germany has the best system of Tech-Voc education. The declaration stated, among other things, that “the participants intend to support the integration of dual training into the educational system of the Republic of the Philippines; with the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA) as lead implementing agency, and in close coordination with the Department of Education (DepEd), especially on its K to 12 program.”
Since it is the legal voice of Philippine business, the Philippine Chamber of Commerce and Industry (PCCI) signed Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) with both TESDA and DepEd.
The MOU between PCCI and DepEd states, among other things, that “the DepEd shall, whenever appropriate and practical, allow SHS offering the TVL track to use Dual Training as their mode of delivery” and “whenever appropriate and practical, allow Dual Training as a mode of delivery in any of the Track Subjects, provided that the standards expected for these subjects as detailed in the relevant K to 12 Curriculum Guides of the DepEd are sufficiently covered.”
This “mode of delivery” is what is referred to by the second meaning of “immersion.”
If we go to the DepEd website (“K to 12” then “Curriculum Guides” then “Senior High School Specialized Subjects” then “Technical-Vocational-Livelihood Track”), we can see why students have to be immersed in workplaces to get the skills that will give them NCs.
(To be continued) http://www.philstar.com/…/17/1500706/immersion-mode-delivery